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Ukraine cyber police debunk Russian surrender lie


As Russia continues to wage war on Ukraine, authorities there have exposed another digital disinformation campaign that falsely claims the invaded country has surrendered territory to the Kremlin.

The messages sent to citizens purportedly claim to be from the Office of the President of Ukraine, claiming a “ceasefire with the Russian Federation” and “the transfer of part of the territories to the aggressor country.”

The politically motivated emails also featured pirated Ukrainian government logos to make them more convincing, mirroring a common tactic employed by social engineering and phishing scammers.

Debunked - Russian emails pretending to be from Ukraine surrendering
Debunked: Ukraine exposes as fakes Russian emails claiming it has surrendered territory to the Kremlin

But the messages are fakes, the Cyber Police of Ukraine warned in a bulletin released on January 29th, likely sent by a Russian disinformation outfit known as the “informational psychological special operation.”

Police say the operation “aims to influence the moral and psychological state of Ukrainian citizens and discredit the state leadership.”

Indeed, such campaigns of online intimidation and deception are nothing new and have paralleled Russia’s kinetic or conventional acts of aggression on the battlefield.

A deepfake video that apparently showed Ukraine’s president, Volodymyr Zelensky, calling on people to lay down their arms was exposed shortly after hostilities began in February 2023.

The Cyber Police of Ukraine and the Center For Combating Disinformation are both urging citizens to be wary of any unsolicited links or emails ostensibly sent to them by government ministries, as these are likely to be fakes.

“Do not follow dubious hyperlinks, because a phishing resource may be hiding behind them,” they said. “Never enter sensitive data on suspicious sites. Download programs and applications only from official sources. Trust only verified information on the official pages of state bodies.”


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“Do not follow dubious hyperlinks, because a phishing resource may be hiding behind them,” they said. “Never enter sensitive data on suspicious sites. Download programs and applications only from official sources. Trust only verified information on the official pages of state bodies.”



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