© 2022 CyberNews - Latest tech news,
product reviews, and analyses.

If you purchase via links on our site, we may receive affiliate commissions.

Facebook got rid of a page tracking Musk’s private jet


“Really, Facebook?” Tweeted Jack Sweeney after the social media giant unpublished his page tracking billionaire’s flights.

Jack Sweeney has been tracking celebrities’ jets. Whether it’s Biden flying to the Queen’s funeral or Kim Kardashian going to Milan, Sweeney knows. A separate Twitter account, @ElonJet, dedicated to tracking Musk’s flights, seems to be the most popular of his pages, with close to 500,00 followers.

The page is updated as often as Musk takes a flight and includes detailed information, including gas consumption, cost of fuel, and CO2 emissions.

According to the Protocol, Musk tried to stop 19-year-old Sweeney from tracking his jet to keep “crazy people” from stalking his location. Musk allegedly offered $5,000 to delete the @ElonJet Twitter account, to which Sweeney replied: “Any chance to up that to $50k? It would be great support in college and would possibly allow me to get a car maybe even a Model 3.”

While Sweeney’s Twitter account is still posting almost daily updates, Meta decided to suspend the “Elon Musk’s Jet” page on Facebook.

“Hi Jack, Unfortunately, your Page, Elon Musk’s Jet, has been unpublished because it violates Facebook Page terms. This means that you can still see the page, but other people won’t be able to see it and you won’t be able to add new people to help you work on your Page. If you think this is a mistake, please let us know,” the Facebook message reads.

While flight tracking might be a new climate accountability tool, as the Protocol aptly put it, it also poses privacy and safety risks to high-profile celebrities and politicians.

Users have other means to track flights, with FlightRadar24 being one of the most popular tracking tools. The site almost crashed when users flooded to FlightRadar24 to watch the historic US House of Representatives Speaker Nancy Pelosi's visit to Taipei. At one point, over 600,000 were using the tool to observe Pelosi's flight from Malaysia to Taiwan.


More from Cybernews:

Cyberstalking: moving to criminalize the practice that destroys lives

Security researchers bypassed AirTag's anti-stalking protection

Cyberstalking likely to increase in Post-Roe America

Zoomers and Millennials more likely to spy on their partners

Signs that you may have been targeted by stalkerware

How Apple AirTags can be used to stalk you

Subscribe to our newsletter



Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked