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How to block ISP from tracking your history

How to Block ISP tracking

Many people feel uneasy about having their personal information on the internet. But can your ISP (Internet Service Provider) track your history and see what you’re downloading?

An ISP is a company that allows you to have access to the internet. Some are privately run, while others are community-owned. But they all track your online activity, citing the official reason of improving the user experience.

Luckily, there is a way around this. If you don’t want your ISP keeping tabs on what you’re doing, you can use a VPN to keep your information private. It does this by encrypting your data, so that your ISP won’t be able to view it, track it or store it. This also keeps all your online activity safe from third parties and hackers.

But how easy is it to do? And are there any other ways you can stop your ISP from tracking your internet history? Read on to find out everything you need to know.

Short guide on how to stop ISP monitoring

How to block ISP from tracking your activity
  1. Choose a VPN that suits you. We recommend NordVPN, as it offers excellent security.
  2. Create a profile and download the app.
  3. Log in to your VPN account through the app.
  4. You should be set! Your information will now be sent to the nearest VPN server and encrypted.

What can your ISP see?

Unless you’re already using a VPN, your ISP can track and log all your online activity. This includes:

  • Emails
  • Websites you have visited
  • Online searches
  • Files you have downloaded
  • When and where you connect to the internet
  • Social media data
  • All your passwords

But why do ISPs track your data at all? The official reason is to improve the user experience. ISPs are also required by law in some countries to store users’ search information for a certain period of time.

But ISPs can profit by selling your data. Online marketing is incredibly data driven and marketers will pay a lot of money for the highly detailed bank of information your ISP has on you. It is totally legal for an ISP to sell your data in the US.

How VPNs work screenshot

How to stop ISP from spying on your browsing activity

Using a reliable VPN is the best way of hiding your activity from your ISP. Not only does it encrypt all the information about you, it also transfers your IP address to the VPN’s server. This means that your ISP can’t track your location when you use the internet.

But VPNs aren’t the only method you can use to block ISP tracking. In this section, we’ll take a closer look at VPNs and some of the other options you can use to protect your data, such as using a Proxy, the Tor network and HTTPS websites.

1. Use a VPN service to block ISP tracking

VPNs can mask your data and the information your ISP tries to log about you. They also hide your information from hackers and other spammers or data thieves. There are a wide variety of VPNs out there you can choose from. Here are some of our favorites:

NordVPN

Probably the most well-known VPN service available, NordVPN provides military-level encryption and features to block unwanted ads as you browse.

Screenshot of NordVPN speed features

ExpressVPN

While ExpressVPN might be a little more expensive than a lot of other VPN providers on the market, it provides great server speed and usability. And it’s one of the best VPNs for unblocking censored sites and getting around geo-restrictions.

ExpressVPN features screenshot

Surfshark

Surfshark VPN offers fantastic value for money as it’s very reasonably priced. It is also incredibly safe and very user friendly.

Surfshark feature comparison table with other VPNs

2. Use a Proxy server to reroute your traffic

Using a proxy server is a slightly less common but effective way of getting around geo-restricted sites and hiding your browsing activity from ISPs. They work by routing your information through various servers that could be in or outside your resident country.

However, a proxy server won’t encrypt your information, so the contents of what you’re looking at will still be on display to your ISP. Check the main differences between VPN and Proxy.

You have to be certain that the proxy server you are using is trustworthy. If you’re unlucky enough to use a proxy that is run by a dishonest company, you can leave your information open to manipulation and your device vulnerable to malware.

Proxy servers also only work on specific apps or your browser, whereas a VPN will protect all your internet traffic. One slight advantage of a proxy server however, is that server speeds are generally faster than you will get with a VPN.

3. Use a Tor network to protect your personal information

Tor is an encrypted browser that takes your information through a number of servers around the globe in order to hide information from your ISP. Thousands of these servers (or nodes) act to confuse and encrypt the information of the sites you visit. But having these thousands of nodes can seriously impact the performance of your browsing.

On top of this, Tor will only protect your information and block your ISP from tracking your activity while you’re using the browser, and not while you’re using other apps.

Still, Tor is a popular choice with many as it’s easy to install and use. But the problem is, you can’t be sure what servers your information is passing through. It’s unlikely, but your browsing details could pass through servers belonging to another ISP, a hacker, or a government agency.

4. Use HTTPS websites only

The simplest and easiest way to offer yourself some protection from snooping ISPs is to use HTTPS websites. You are probably pretty familiar with HTTPS, as it appears at the start of many URLs. Any URLs that have HTTPS encrypt the content on the page, hiding it from the ISP you’re using.

HTTP stands for HyperText Transfer Protocol, and it’s essentially the method in which information is transferred from server to user. The S on the end of the HTTPS signifies an SSL, or Secure Socket Layer. This means the information on the page is encrypted and therefore invisible to the ISP.

However, while it can’t see what you’re doing on HTTPS sites, your ISP can still track which sites you’ve visited. So realistically, it can still gather quite a lot of information about you, even if they can’t see exactly what content you’ve been looking at.

How do I protect my browsing history on different devices?

Your ISP can track and store your information on any number of devices. So you need to protect more than just your computer, especially if you use the same profiles on your laptop, phone, computer and tablet.

Protect your PC and laptop from ISP tracking

Installing a reputable VPN, such as NordVPN, on your laptop or PC will protect every single one of the devices in your home from ISPs.

Most VPNs will automatically configure the best settings for you and protect every device in your home. If it doesn’t, you can manually set up a VPN on Chrome, Windows, Apple and IOS devices.

Block ISP tracking of your mobile or tablet

When you connect to the internet through your mobile phone provider, that provider becomes your ISP. And you can be sure they are tracking and storing everything you do as you browse the internet.

A VPN will hide your information from your mobile provider. However, it’s worth noting that, if you protect one device and not another, your ISP can still track you. It can use clues like linked Gmail addresses to determine that you’re the same person, and keep storing your data and logging your activity furthermore it cant start throttling you speed.

How to protect your smart TV from ISP tracking

In 2021, virtually all new TVs come with built-in internet connectivity. So they use an internet service provider, and that means that your activity is tracked. Many people enter card details or make payments through their smart TVs, so they can gather a lot of information on you.

To block ISP tracking of your TV, it can be a good idea to disable the native internet on your TV and instead install your choice of streaming box or stick. You could also cast onto your TV using a device that is already protected by a VPN you have set up.

The bottom line

If you value your privacy and don’t want to take any risks with your online data or the security of your home or your finances, it’s well worth taking some steps to protect your online activity.

Encrypt your information with a combination of VPNs and HTTPS sites and ensure you are protected on all devices, and you can rest easy in the knowledge that that thousands of data points you’ve left all over the internet cannot be used for any malicious purposes.

Do you think we’ve missed out any ways to protect yourself and block ISPs from tracking your internet history? If you have any thoughts, suggestions or even points to debate, please leave them in the comments section below!

FAQs

How do you stop your ISP from spying on you?

Install a VPN to protect your devices and encrypt your information online.
– Use encrypted browsers such as Tor.
– Make use of proxy servers to route your information in a way that stops ISPs from tracking you.
– Browse on websites that have the HTTPS tag at the start of their URL.

How long does your ISP keep your browsing history?

– In the UK, ISPs store your data for 12 months.
– In the US, ISPs store your data for 6 months.
– In India, ISPs store 6 months’ worth of data.
– In the EU, ISPs store data for at least 6 months, but no longer than two years.

Can ISP track your incognito browsing history?

In short, yes. Your incognito browsing only prevents websites from using cookies and keeps your browser history clear, but your ISP can still see exactly what you are doing.

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