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What is a VPN?


VPN stands for Virtual Private Network. In simple terms, it is a service that protects your privacy and Internet connection while online, as well as helps bypass censorship and other restrictions.

It does this by creating an encrypted tunnel through which to send your data. In a sense, a VPN acts as a middleman between your device and remote servers, and carries your data over existing networks without exposing it to the public Internet.

It can especially benefit you while using public wifi networks – a VPN will ensure your IP address is hidden and your online identity is secured from ISPs, third parties, or any prying eyes.

In this article, we’ll explain what a VPN is and how it works in more detail, as well as cover the ways it can be useful for privacy in your daily life.

How does a VPN work?

A VPN changes your real IP address by rerouting your traffic through one of its servers through an encrypted tunnel. Simply put, you need a remote server and a VPN tunneling protocol (or VPN client app) to establish a secure connection.

Let’s look at an example of how visiting Amazon would work without a VPN. You enter the Amazon homepage, it loads, and you can do your Christmas shopping.

Here’s how it works in more technical terms:

  1. Your browser contacts a Domain Name Server (DNS) assigned by your ISP, asking it to translate the website domain into an IP address.
  2. Knowing the Amazon server’s IP address, your device can now send a request and retrieve the website.
  3. Your ISP routes your request to the Amazon server and returns a response.

This is very simplified, but that’s essentially how any connection works if you’re not using a VPN. In this example, the Amazon website is secure and uses TLS/SSL (HTTPS), so your connection is encrypted. If you visit an insecure website that doesn’t have TLS, your data won’t be encrypted.

But despite the TLS encryption, this type of session still isn’t completely private. By sending a DNS request to your ISP, you are telling your ISP that you want to visit Amazon.com. Amazon also knows your IP address and can therefore determine your location as well as, potentially, your identity.

Now let’s look at an example of how visiting Amazon would work if you were using a VPN:

  1. Firstly, you would connect to a VPN server in a country of your choosing, let's say the UK.
  2. The VPN app uses a tunneling protocol to create an encrypted connection to the VPN server.
  3. You head over to Amazon’s homepage. Yet this time, the DNS query is resolved by the VPN, denying your ISP knowledge of what you’re doing.
  4. The VPN establishes a connection between their server and the Amazon.com server.
  5. Traffic goes from you to the VPN server, then to Amazon’s server, and back.
VPN diagram

That’s how a VPN establish a secure connection between you and the Internet. It serves you well especially if you’re using a public wifi network. Also, a top-class VPN will ensure a no-logs policy, which means that none of you data can be tracked, recorded, or otherwise compromised.

Why should you use VPN?

A VPN can not only help you protect your privacy – it brings many more benefits than staying secured from prying Internet eyes. Here are some other advantages of using VPN:

  • Data encryption. A VPN encrypts your data by rerouting your traffic via an encrypted tunnel. This makes your data secure and completely anonymous. Hence, nobody can expose your identity and your data is protected from the rest of the Internet.
  • Hides your online activities. Using a VPN helps you avoid surveillance – all your ISP will see is you connecting to a VPN and none of your online activities can be exposed.
  • Access geo-restricted content. With a VPN, you can bypass the government censorship and blocks, because you’ll be connecting to the Internet through a server in another country which doesn’t have Internet content censorship laws. You can access and stream content from popular streaming services.
  • Secure public wifi networks. A VPN’s primary function is security and privacy protection. It comes in particularly handy when you’re faced with using public wifi in airports or cafes.
  • Torrenting. Being caught while torrenting can lead to legal issues, which is why many torrenters use VPNs to hide their IP address and protect their identity.
  • Gaming. A VPN for gamers can up your online gaming experience, helping avoid cyberattacks as well as improve performance.
  • Shopping. With a VPN, you get more flexibility with online purchases. A VPN will prevent you from falling prey to price discrimination – the practice of charging a different price for the same goods or services depending on your location. Also, you can access different local store versions by changing your virtual location with a VPN.

We did our research and selected the most popular questions people ask about VPNs. Save your time – we got you the answers. Here we listed some of the key things people want to know about VPNs.

Yes, VPNs are legal in most countries around the world. However, some governments, such as Russia’s or China’s, restrict the use of VPNs. Hence, you need to take this into consideration when using a VPN in those VPN-sensitive regions.

Does VPN slow down the Internet?

Technically – yes. A VPN can slow down your Internet connection, as there’s an extra step in the process – Internet traffic going through a VPN server. On the bright side, the impact won’t be noticeable if you use a premium VPN.

Are VPNs safe?

In most cases, yes. Using a top-class VPN ensures online security and comes with many great benefits, such as bypassing censorship and accessing geo-restricted content. However, free VPNs might not be as safe and private as premium because of the tendency of selling data to third parties.

Are VPNs worth it?

Yes, a quality VPN keeps your data safe and protects your online anonymity. A VPN is an ideal solution whether you want to access geo-restricted content, integrate an extra layer of privacy, improve your torrenting or gaming experience, or safely use a public network.

VPN vulnerabilities

There are no perfect cybersecurity products, and using a VPN comes with some risks as well. Here are some potential VPN vulnerabilities that you should be aware of:

  1. Some VPN services still use outdated protocols with known vulnerabilities. That is why most leading providers have phased out the Point-to-Point Tunneling Protocol (PPTP).
  2. Hackers can impersonate VPN servers and intercept your data if your VPN is insecure.
  3. Your real IP address can leak if a VPN server goes down while you’re connected and compromise your privacy. Premium VPNs offer kill switch features to disable your Internet connection when the VPN drops.
  4. Your data is probably being sold if a VPN service is free. Think about it: the maintenance of server fleets costs money. Hence, when the service is free, the money has to come from somewhere. In many cases, the VPN is collecting your data and selling it off to third parties.
  5. Some VPNs log user data, even though the logging may not be extensive. There have been instances of several VPN providers handing over user data to governments when asked. That’s why it’s important to make sure that your chosen provider is a no-logs VPN.
  6. VPN doesn’t protect your from malware. For enhanced protection from viruses, malware, trojans, or bots, you should use antivirus software. Some premium VPN providers, such as NordVPN or Surfshark, offer antivirus or ad blocker features that can serve you well in this case.

What to look for when choosing a VPN?

VPN services are not made equal. Some of them have more features, better security measures. Others have completed third-party audits that add credibility to their transparency claims. When choosing a VPN service, you’re making a conscious decision to trust a company with your data. The least you could do is invest time in some research.

Here are a few things to look out for:

#1 Reputation

Even if you’re just looking for a VPN to unblock Netflix, the service’s reputation is essential. Your privacy is important and you should never trade it.

Unfortunately, it can be challenging to know what VPN services are up to behind closed doors. Yet if a VPN provider has been caught red-handed giving away user data or bending the truth about their services – that’s a good way to know which VPN not to choose.

#2 Jurisdiction

Where a VPN operates from matters. Some countries require VPNs to collect user data whereas others have harsh copyright laws. As a user of such a VPN, you run the risk of letting your data get into the wrong hands.

The Edward Snowden leaks shed light on the scope of surveillance around the globe. If you think that living outside of the US makes you safe against the NSA and you’ll have nothing to worry about, think again. The surveillance alliance known colloquially as the 14-Eyes shares intelligence data on each other’s citizens. And they’re not even the worst of the bunch.

#3 Anonymous payment options

You are as anonymous as your method of payment. Paying with a credit card leaves records not only on your banking statement but in the company’s accounting logs. It never hurts to check if your chosen service supports payments via cryptocurrency, prepaid cards, or other options. As a rule of thumb, the less personal information you provide, the better the service is for your privacy.

#4 Technical specifications

Encryption, reliable tunneling protocols, leak protection, speed, a kill switch – all of these are necessary for a secure VPN. The provider can be very transparent, but if they don’t have the tech to provide privacy and security, you’re going to have a bad time.

As there are hundreds of VPN services to choose from, picking the best one might seem like a daunting task. Luckily, there are a few ways to distinguish the good from the bad. Here’s what you need to look for in a quality VPN:

  • Tunneling protocols. Not all VPN protocols were created equal. Some, like PPTP, are downright outdated. So, when choosing your VPN, look for fast and secure protocols like OpenVPN, IKEv2, and WireGuard.
  • Server list. It comes without saying that you should pick a VPN that offers servers in the country you want to connect to. However, a broader coverage is always better in general, as the servers won’t be as crowded. You should also look for servers near you for a faster connection.
  • Logging policy. Always read the logging policy of the VPN you’re about to download. Look for a service that doesn’t keep any personal logs. Also, it’s better when the logging policy is audited by an independent third-party.
  • Streaming and torrenting. Not all VPN services are able to unblock various streaming platforms like Netflix. Similarly, not all VPNs support torrenting. Keep this in mind when looking for your perfect VPN – usually, reading a couple of reviews will give you the gist of whether the VPN will suit your needs.
  • Apps and devices. Whether you use Windows, macOS, iOS, Android, or Linux, it’s a good idea to check whether a VPN offers a good application for your operating system. Some VPNs also support routers, smart TVs, and gaming consoles.

If you find it too difficult to pick a VPN yourself, you can check out our list of the best VPNs or simply download one of our top choices like NordVPN or Surfshark.

How to set up a VPN connection

The complexity of setting up a VPN connection depends on whether you are using a VPN app, or attempting to manually configure VPN files on your chosen device.

Using a VPN app is usually pretty simple and straightforward, while manual setup and installation on routers or devices that don’t necessarily support VPNs require some technical knowledge.

Set up a VPN on your device

Setting up a VPN on a device such as Windows or Mac computers, as well as iPhone or iPad, or Android devices is very simple, because most VPN providers have dedicated apps for them. Here’s how to set up a VPN on your device:

  1. Purchase a VPN subscription. NordVPN has apps for all major operating systems and some other devices as well.
  2. Download the app and follow installation instructions.
  3. Open the app and connect to a VPN server.

Set up a VPN manually

Most devices have built-in VPNs that you can configure to your liking. However, they might not support certain tunneling protocols such as WireGuard or OpenVPN, or you might not be able to choose from a variety of locations.

Besides that, setting up a VPN manually requires certain additional knowledge. Built-in VPNs also might not be as secure as the third-party VPN providers.

Nevertheless, if you’d like to try this, we suggest taking a look at our extensive guide on how to manually set up a VPN on different devices.

Install a VPN on your router

Installing a VPN on your router is the best way to set up a VPN connection for devices that don’t support VPNs, or if you want to protect your whole home network.

The process of setting up a VPN on a router is more complicated than manually setting it up on a device that already supports VPNs. Besides, not all routers support VPNs either. You won’t be able to install a VPN on most ISP-issued routers or older models.

As setting up a VPN on your router requires some technical knowledge and focus, we suggest you take a look at our guide on how to install a VPN on your router.

What is a VPN client?

A VPN client (or a VPN app) is the software on your device that communicates with a VPN server, establishes the connection, and encrypts data.

How does a VPN client work?

A VPN app (or client) is where you control your VPN experience: which server to connect to, which tunneling protocol to use, or which features to activate. Most VPN service providers have apps for Windows, macOS, Android, iOS, Linux, Amazon Fire TV, and other devices and operating systems.

That said, you can also use a VPN without a custom VPN app. All major operating systems offer VPN functionality in some form. For example, you can set up a VPN connection through your networking settings on Windows.

You can also set up a VPN client on your wifi router by following instructions from your VPN provider.

What is a VPN server?

A VPN server is what enables users to use the VPN service in the first place. It is a combination of VPN hardware, such as physical servers stored in physical places, and VPN software.

The top providers have hundreds or even thousands of servers scattered across the globe. The further the VPN server is from the user’s real location, the worse the performance will be, so servers in various locations are important for better performance. On top of that, the more locations a provider has servers in, the more virtual locations a user can connect to without actually having to move.

Some providers also use diskless, RAM-only servers. These are the kind of servers that have no external storage, and any data that’s on them gets wiped clean with every server reboot. VPN providers choose RAM-only servers to ensure complete user privacy and comply with their no-logs policies.

What does a VPN server do?

A VPN server forwards your Internet traffic to the destination server and returns the response to you.

When you connect to a VPN server, your IP address changes, and so does your virtual location. Thus, the websites that you visit will assume that you’re based in the VPN servers’ country. This is especially useful for bypassing geo-restrictions and various other content blocks and Internet censorship.

explanation what a vpn server does

By contrast, if you’re not connecting through a VPN server, the owner of any website you visit will know your real IP address and your location. You may want to avoid this for privacy reasons, as well as certain content restrictions. Some websites and services are available only in specific locations, or have local versions.

What is VPN encryption?

VPN encryption is a process of making the data traveling between a device and a VPN server unreadable to anyone without an encryption key, namely other devices.

VPN tunnels that go from your device to the VPN service provider’s server are also secured by using encryption.

VPN encrypts all of your Internet traffic, including your browser, torrent, messaging app traffic, or whatever else you may be doing on the internet. No one will be able to see or intercept your online activities because of VPN encryption

Although encryption slows down your connection a little, it does not interfere with your ability to connect to the Internet. It simply makes it impossible for someone to reveal network exchanges.

How does VPN encryption work?

Your data is encrypted all throughout the transferring process between a device and a VPN server. It gets deciphered only at the endpoint – when leaving the VPN tunnel and entering your device.

Symmetric encryption diagram

VPNs use three types of cryptography: symmetric encryption, asymmetric encryption, and hashing. Here’s how VPN encryption works:

  1. When you connect to a VPN server, the connection performs a “handshake” between a VPN client and a VPN server. During this step, hashing is used to authenticate that the user is interacting with a real VPN server, and asymmetric encryption is used to exchange symmetric encryption keys.A few popular examples of asymmetric (or public key) protocols used at this stage are RSA or Diffie-Hellman.
  2. Once the handshake is successful, symmetric encryption is used to encrypt all data passing between the user and the VPN server. The most common symmetric encryption cipher used by VPNs is AES (specifically, AES-256).

Most top VPN services rely on the Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) cipher to seal the data that goes through – the same type of encryption that financial and government institutions use.

What is AES-256?

AES-256 stands for Advanced Encryption Standard using 256-bit integers to process data. It is a symmetric key encryption algorithm for encryption and decryption. Generally, it’s considered the gold standard of modern encryption. VPNs use it to create a safe tunnel for your private data exchanges.

how AES works diagram

You might see weaker AES standards like AES-128. This simply implies that the cryptographic key is shorter and easier (although still virtually impossible) to “brute force.” As a rule of thumb, the longer the encryption key, the more potential combinations, which would take longer to crack. It’s the same principle as using a longer password means it’s harder to guess.

On the flip side, a longer encryption key means slower connections because the encryption and decryption take longer.

In the wild, you will most often find three variations of AES: AES-128, AES-192, and AES-256. Additionally, you may encounter different modes of operation, such as AES-256-GCM or AES-256-CBC.

Not all tunneling protocols support this kind of encryption. For example, PPTP uses the much weaker MPPE cipher, whereas the new WireGuard protocol primarily uses ChaCha20.

What is VPN tunneling?

A VPN tunnel is an encrypted link that connects your computer or mobile device to an external network. A VPN tunnel, which stands for Virtual Private Network tunnel, can be used to conceal your online activity.

How does VPN tunneling work?

To connect to the Internet via a VPN tunnel, you must first sign up with a Virtual Private Network (VPN) service. The VPN is essential for concealing your IP address and protecting your online activity from prying eyes.

vpn tunnel

Once you connect to your chosen server, a VPN tunnel will be established. Without it, your ISP sees your online activities, but this is impossible after you connect to a VPN server. That's because of the encryption and hidden IP address.

The VPN tunnel channels your traffic through to a VPN server, hiding your IP. Without the IP, there's no way to tell your location.

Types of VPN

There are several different types of a VPN. We put up a concise overview of each of the VPN type for you to have a better understanding what divides VPN into different categories.

The main types of a VPN are:

Remote access VPN

A remote access VPN allows you to connect to a private network, such as your company's office network, via the Internet.

The Internet is an untrustworthy communication channel. VPN encryption is used to protect and secure data as it travels to and from the private network.

Personal VPN

A personal VPN service links you to a VPN server, which functions as a between link for your device and the Internet services you want to use.

A personal VPN encrypts your connection, hides your identity online, and allows you to spoof your geographic location.

Site-to-site VPN

A virtual private network (VPN) that connects two or more networks, such as a corporate network and a branch office network, is known as a site-to-site VPN.

Site-to-site VPNs are widely used by businesses with various offices in different geographic areas that require continuous access to and use of the corporate network.

VPN protocols

The primary function of a VPN protocol or tunneling protocol is to establish a safe tunnel between your device and the VPN server. When a VPN connects to a VPN server, it creates a tunnel to send data. The protocol used to create this connection determines how your data is sent through the network.

Some protocols are more secure, some are faster, some are better on mobile devices or older PCs, some are better at bypassing firewalls, and some are just outdated.

Common VPN protocols

Most VPN providers didn’t develop the protocols themselves but merely implemented the technology in their apps. Here are the most common protocols that you could find in most VPN clients:

  • IKEv2. It stands for Internet Key Exchange version 2. It mainly handles request and response confirmations. For authentication, IPSec is also often used together with IKEv2 (IKEv2/IPSec). This protocol is very efficient on an unreliable connection. IKEv2 effectively reestablishes after a connection loss. It’s also one of the fastest, most used tunneling protocols on mobile devices because it can easily switch between wireless to cellular connection, and vice versa.
  • OpenVPN. By far the most common tunneling protocol on desktop apps. This is an open-source protocol based on OpenSSL. It comes in two types – TCP and UDP.
  • UDP. It’s the User Datagram Protocol. It is much faster because it doesn’t allow the recipient to resend data requests. This means less verification of data integrity, which allows for more rapid exchanges, hence better speeds.
  • TCP. It’s the Transmission Control Protocol. It allows multiple data verifications, so the processing time may be slower, limiting your Internet speed. Use UDP on the networks you can trust, while TCP will be better on public wifi hotspots.
  • L2TP/IPSec. On its own, L2TP doesn’t provide any encryption. Its job is request and response confirmations. Encryption enters the arena with IPSec, which is often used in conjunction. There are many discussions about whether this protocol is secure because it was co-developed with the NSA. The Edward Snowden leaks seemed to imply that the NSA may have backdoors to access L2TP/IPSec traffic.
  • WireGuard. This is the next-gen of tunneling protocols. It uses fewer lines of code, making it easier to audit, and squeezes the most out of your device’s processing power. It’s ideal for mobile devices and slower computers, has up-do-date encryption built-in, and offers reliable connections. WireGuard gives the best performance of any current VPN tunneling protocol.
  • SSTP. Secure Socket Tunneling Protocol. Created by Microsoft, this protocol is not exclusive to Windows and provides a high level of encryption. While SSTP is very capable, there are concerns that Microsoft may have backdoors to access SSTP traffic.
  • PPTP. Point to Point Tunneling Protocol. Developed in the late ’90s and the first to become widely available. This protocol relies on outdated encryption, which has become vulnerable to brute force attacks as computing power grew. As such, few VPN service providers currently offer this protocol.

Proprietary VPN protocols

Some VPN service providers have developed their own tunneling protocols:

  • Catapult Hydra – developed for the Hotspot Shield VPN service. The company claims that this protocol allows the service to achieve much better connection speeds than using standard tunneling protocols. Whether due to Catapult Hydra or other reasons, Hotspot Shield has always been among the fastest VPNs.
  • NordLynx – only available on NordVPN. NordLynx is a modified version of WireGuard, solving potential security issues while keeping the performance intact.
  • Lightway – only available on ExpressVPN. It uses an open-source implementation of Transport Layer Security (TLS), wolfSSL. Its goal is to be as lightweight as possible, aiming for ease of maintenance and high performance.
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FAQ

Comments

Kiran rai
Kiran rai
prefix 11 months ago
Hi,
My work place is in hamad port. Where my wifi has great security .i cannot access to many website.i had try many free VPN. But it doesn't work in qatar(hamad port).could you name few VPN which might work in wifi ( where forti guard has access blocked ) .pls
Cybernews Team
Cybernews Team
prefix 10 months ago
Hello!
We suggest starting off by checking out our article about free VPNs here: https://cybernews.com/best-vpn/free-vpn-services/

In general, however, there is no guarantee that any VPN will work on a specific location for a specific cause. Free VPNs tend to work worse, due to the fact they have smaller server fleets and their IPs are pretty well known to various VPN-blocking tools. However, even the free options have some aces up their sleeves, so give those options a shot.
Sebastian
Sebastian
prefix 1 year ago
this is a great explanation about what is vpn and how it works. I really liked the illlustrations. These are really complex things you’ve showed but I found it easy to read. Good job! Keep it up! :))
Ken
Ken
prefix 1 year ago
Hello. Sorry if this place is not suitable for this topic, but how to check to see if my vpn is working on my phone? I have Redmi and there is a built-in VPN and simply one button : turn on/off. And when I turn it on – nothing happens.
Tadas Švenčionis
Tadas Švenčionis
prefix 1 year ago
Hi Ken,

Probably the easiest way to check is to look up your IP address (just Google “what is my IP?”) with your VPN off and compare it to when the VPN is (or should be) on. If you’re seeing the same IP address, the VPN is not working.

To my knowledge (and take this with a grain of salt as I don’t have a Xiaomi phone) there is no VPN “app” with a related VPN network on the MIUI, which means to make it work you likely first need a server to connect to. Unless you’ve set that up manually, it shouldn’t work.
Garry
Garry
prefix 1 year ago
I’ve learned a lot about VPNs recently and considered getting one for myself. I’ve come across one term and have wondered what it is and how it applies to me and my router. What is VPN passthrough linksys?
Tadas Švenčionis
Tadas Švenčionis
prefix 1 year ago
Hi Garry,

Without getting too technical, VPN passthrough is a router feature that lets you use older VPN protocols (particularly PPTP and IPSec). Linksys is just a router brand.

Unless you want to use these older protocols (and there really are few reasons you would), VPN passthrough is irrelevant to you.
Bill Hopkins
Bill Hopkins
prefix 1 year ago
Can internet provider see VPN? For example in China, where government is against VPNs , how they detect that you are using a VPN? Probably internet providers can see that you are accessing with a VPN. I have no other explanations.
Tadas Švenčionis
Tadas Švenčionis
prefix 1 year ago
Hi Bill,

There are a few ways. Firstly, you’re connecting to the VPN via your ISP, so they may know the IP address you’re connecting to is a VPN server’s IP address. Failing that, there’s also traffic analysis, which can tell what protocol you’re using to connect, e.g. OpenVPN.
Axel
Axel
prefix 1 year ago
Why won’t my VPN work at school? Is it possible that my school router has some special settings that block any other IP and let’s only school IP to access internet? My VPN works perfectly at home, and even when using mobile data, but when i try it on schools wifi – it doesn’t connect.
Tadas Švenčionis
Tadas Švenčionis
prefix 1 year ago
Hi Axel,

Yes, it’s possible there’s some firewall blocking your VPN connection. Try a few different servers or try a different tunneling protocol (particularly if your VPN service has some sort of “stealth” or “obfuscation” protocol/mode).
Samuel
Samuel
prefix 1 year ago
i’ve only started learning cybersecurity and it seems more difficult than i thought.  is incognito mode a vpn feature?  i look in settings but can’t find it! please tell me where to find it, as i want to browse internet in a safe and private mode
Tadas Švenčionis
Tadas Švenčionis
prefix 1 year ago
Hi Samuel,

Incognito mode is a browser feature, rather than a VPN feature. Typically, it prevents some browser-based tracking technologies (such as cookies). Using that in conjunction with a VPN (which prevents IP-based tracking) is how you can achieve safe and private browsing.
Ardon 55
Ardon 55
prefix 1 year ago
Hello! I have a question – how to trace VPN IP address ? I often connect to public wifi and browse controversial websites. I wonder can the government or hackers trace that I’m using a VPN and what VPN exactly by detecting the IP. 
Tadas Švenčionis
Tadas Švenčionis
prefix 1 year ago
Hi,
Yes, the government can theoretically find out if you’re using a VPN and even what VPN you’re using (although there are ways around it). However, finding out what you’re doing once you’re connected to the VPN is a different matter entirely. To find out, someone would have to contact the VPN service provider and ask for data on you. The catch is that many VPNs don’t keep data relating to your online activities (or any data at all) – these are known as “no log” VPN services. If that’s what you’re aiming for, NordVPN, ExpressVPN, Surfshark, Mullvad will all do the job.
Hannah
Hannah
prefix 1 year ago
in my country a couple of news source websites are blocked now. that’s very sad, since they were non biased and very interesting to read. does vpn bypass blocked websites ? in this case i would buy a vpn, as it feels that a couple of websites might be affected too, and there won’t be anything left to read.
Tadas Švenčionis
Tadas Švenčionis
prefix 1 year ago
Hi Hannah,

Yes, you can use a VPN to unblock websites. Before you get a subscription, however, I suggest you check your country’s attitude toward VPNs. In some countries, caution is advised when using them (and also, some VPN services will work better than others if the country is blocking VPN traffic).
miles
miles
prefix 1 year ago
what vpn protocol should i use to watch Netflix? i’m using pia vpn. i have a quite slow internet and sometimes watching movies online the buffering screen appears. but sometimes vpns help to increase speed with a proper protocol, so i need to know which one is the proper one.
Tadas Švenčionis
Tadas Švenčionis
prefix 1 year ago
Hi miles,

WireGuard is typically the fastest tunneling protocol choice and PIA does have it available.
Liam
Liam
prefix 1 year ago
Before buying VPN I want to know experts opinion : will a vpn slow my internet speed? You connect to a server that is far from you, so it’s logical that the speed will decrease. However, many providers claim, that it’s quite the opposite. You can even increase your speed and reduce ping in online games. Is it true?
Tadas Švenčionis
Tadas Švenčionis
prefix 1 year ago
Hi Liam,

Yes, a VPN will most likely slow your internet speed down. In some (quite rare) cases, a VPN can increase speeds or produce a better ping in games due to routing nuances or ISP speed throttling. If bad ping or bad speeds are issues you’re trying to solve with a VPN, trying certainly won’t hurt, but pings and speeds are more often bad due to problems VPNs can’t solve.
Dietrich Hass
Dietrich Hass
prefix 2 years ago
Picture a scenario – you and your college buddies are heading to a cofe shop to get some work done because they have free wifi there, however you still wanna keep the traffic hidden. That’s where a vpn comes in. Sadly, only one has a vpn account. Is it possible and how to share vpn connection over wifi on windows 10?
Tadas Švenčionis
Tadas Švenčionis
prefix 2 years ago
Short answer – yes, it’s possible and not very difficult. We’ll probably cover the topic in more detail at some point. For now, check the support page of your VPN provider and you’ll most likely find the relevant instructions.
Philip55
Philip55
prefix 2 years ago
So I’ve been scouring the net for more info about vpns and I came across a particular group of people that hold some interesting beliefs. They say that no commercial vpns can be trusted and that you’re better off hosting one yourself. The logic seems sound, but I’m not entirely convinced. Perhaps you guys could elaborate on this topic? And maybe even write an article about how to set up your own home vpn server?
Tadas Švenčionis
Tadas Švenčionis
prefix 2 years ago
As a matter of fact, we have covered setting up your own VPN server here.

The answer to which is better is probably “it depends.” I would say setting up on your own can be a very good idea if you know what you’re doing. You’ll still have to trust whoever’s hosting your server though, and I’d also say some commercial VPN services have done a great deal to prove they’re not collecting your data.
CheeFraser
CheeFraser
prefix 2 years ago
Thanks to the lockdown I had more time to play video games and stream on Twitch. And it’s looking pretty promising too. However, I am aware that having a larger audience puts me in greater risk of being targeted by trolls or other types of haters. In this situation what do you think is the best vpn for ddos protection?
Tadas Švenčionis
Tadas Švenčionis
prefix 2 years ago
Avoiding DDoS is all about hiding your IP address, which means any half decent VPN that doesn’t leak your IP will do the job. With that said, you’re probably going to need a VPN that offers good connection speeds, so your best bet is something like ExpressVPN or NordVPN.
Christine Morin
Christine Morin
prefix 2 years ago
Could you elaborate on what are the benefits of having a vpn? Everyone keeps prattling on about how it protects your data on unsecure public wifi and hackers will steal your credit cards or something like that. People are barely going out now to use public wifi. So what’s the point really? Put a strong password on your home routers and you’re good on the security front. Isn’t that right?
Tadas Švenčionis
Tadas Švenčionis
prefix 2 years ago
Hi Christine,

In terms of security, the benefit mostly centers around hiding your activities from your ISP and hiding your IP address from the websites you visit. That can be relevant when torrenting, for example. But many people also use VPNs for entertainment – getting more online content than is available in any particular country is a popular use case.
Wiggluthi298
Wiggluthi298
prefix 2 years ago
Do you know what’s best vpn for torrenting and streaming? Wanna kill two birds with one stone. I normally don’t mind paying for streaming services, but it’s really frustrating how the market is fragmented. Do they really expect me to pay a premium subscription for a couple of good shows and a load of low quality stuff? No thanks.
Tadas Švenčionis
Tadas Švenčionis
prefix 2 years ago
For streaming, I’d be inclined to suggest some of the big mainstream choices, like ExpressVPN, NordVPN, or Surfshark. These have good connection speeds and are capable unblockers. For torrenting, any secure VPN that supports torrent traffic and has good speeds will do. Any of the above choices is fine, but you could also go for something like Mullvad, PIA, etc.
Plentype37
Plentype37
prefix 2 years ago
Hey there. Will a vpn slow my internet speed and if so by how much? Things have been getting worse regarding the pandemic and I’ve decided to work more from home, but my boss is telling me that I need to get a vpn in that case. I say no problem but then what about my internet speed? I need something that would not hinder my productivity too much.
Tadas Švenčionis
Tadas Švenčionis
prefix 2 years ago
Yes, a VPN will invariably slow your internet speed. By how much depends on the provider, the server you choose to connect through, etc. The drop-off can range from less than 10% (with good providers and/or nearby server locations) to more than 95% (with bad providers and/or remote server locations).
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