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Enpass Review 2021

Enpass is a password manager with a range of features as well as free and paid for versions. You can use it across multiple platforms to save your passwords, login details, and personal payment information to make your digital life easier.

With a range of password managers to choose from, this Enpass review takes a look at how the software compares to others on the market, its features, ease of use, security and ultimately how effective it is at managing your important details.

Price:From $23.99 a year
Free version:Yes
Platforms:Windows, macOS, Linux, iOS, Android
Rating:4.0

Enpass pros & cons

Pros

  • Attractive interface
  • Good range of features
  • Free on desktop
  • Can sync across platforms
  • Good password generator

Cons

  • Confusing setup
  • Doesn’t import passwords directly from browser
  • Free edition has limited options on mobile
  • No two factor authentication
  • Fairly basic

Is Enpass safe?

Yes, Enpass password manager offers a range of excellent security features to keep your data safe from hackers. Here, we’ll break down the safety features to help you decide if this is the right solution for you.

Encryption

When you put information into Enpass, it uses 256-bit AES military-grade encryption to protect all your data. It even goes a step further by adding another layer of protection with an SQLCipher. This should mean your information is guarded from even serious cyber assaults.

Storage

Enpass does not upload your personal data to its servers. It all stays either on your computer or your mobile device. If you’re worried about losing this data, you can make a backup file that’s fully encrypted and can only be opened by your master password within Enpass. 

You can also sync your backup file to a cloud storage service of your choice, with most major providers supported such as iCloud, Dropbox, Google Drive and more.

Two factor authentication

Enpass is lacking decent two factor authentication options, so you need to make sure your master password is as strong as possible. Which is a bit backwards for a password manager.

Features overview

Enpass has a range of features that focus on managing your passwords and personal information. With such sensitive information, users need to feel secure and confident that their details are in the right place and Enpass certainly offers a variety of options.

Enpass categories screenshot

Organising your passwords on desktop – first impressions

Once you’ve created an account, Enpass will give you access to a main vault where you can store your passwords under encryption. You’re free to create as many vaults as you want, should you wish to save different passwords in different places. For instance, you can set up a vault for work passwords, a separate vault for online shopping passwords and a vault for social media passwords. 

Enpass add vault screenshot

On desktop, the Enpass interface is easy on the eye. You’ll find a range of options along the top of the app such as:

  • Cloud storage settings
  • Creating new entries
  • Search function
  • Password generator
  • General settings 
  • A button to completely lock the app

Within the Settings section, you can backup your passwords, set a PIN code for unlocking the app, sync to a cloud service, share passwords, customise layout and more. You can even switch to dark mode, a popular feature for most apps these days.

Interface layout

Enpass can be navigated on a desktop via its three-column interface. Select from the left, view in the centre and explore selected items further on the right. On that left hand column, you’ll find selectable categories such as Your entries which will include login details, credit card information, personal IDs and more. 

There’s also a Password Audit option, a Tags section and an Other section. There’s no denying it looks great, but it can be tricky to get around and confusing to use sometimes.

Password Generator and Auditor

The Password Audit is one of Enpass’s useful features. It will find any passwords that are weak, compromised or duplicated across several of your accounts.

Bad passwords will be placed in one of three categories – Pwned, Weak, and Identical. After asking your permission, Enpass will run all your passwords through the ‘Have I Been Pwned’ online database. And while Enpass won’t automatically change bad passwords, it will generate strong new suggestions for you to use and maximise your security.

I noticed that the password audit feature found some of my passwords as “Breached” even though none of my accounts were involved in data breaches. That meant that it checked if someone else used the same password and whether it was in the breached passwords database.

Enpass’ default password generator settings will create six word passphrases. These are different to jumbled character strings in the sense that they are just as random but much more memorable, as well as being long enough to pass password strength tests. 

If you’d prefer to go to a more traditional random string password, this can be done too. Enpass’ random string passwords are always 32 characters long. You can choose if you want lower case, upper case, digits or symbols. For safety, we recommend keeping all of these in. If you need a specific password of a certain length, or you wish to omit certain characters, you can do this too.

Enpass password generator screenshot
Enpass password generator

Personal information and form filler

Enpass saves more than just your passwords. You can also save a wide variety of personal information to use across your online accounts, and even sync your information across different devices. You can save details like payment info, debit and credit cards, addresses, contact information and more. Techier options include details for web hosts, FTP servers and data templates.

You can even store things like personal identification numbers, contact lens prescriptions, garment sizes, vehicle registration and more. You can also save photographs and files with your details. 

If you have the Enpass plugin on your browser, you can then use it to automatically fill out forms. Sadly, you don’t automatically get the option when you click on a form field. Instead, you have to go into the extension and click the relevant details.

For instance, Chrome’s built-in password manager will automatically suggest a strong password. If you are making a new account, you just need to click on it below the password field.

With Enpass, you need to click on the extension icon, click “Generate Password”, then click “Fill”. What should be done automatically requires three clicks instead of one.

Authenticator

As mentioned earlier, Enpass does not feature two factor authentication as a security function within the app. However, it can be used as an authenticator for other websites similar to Microsoft Authenticator and Google Authenticator.

Syncing

As we’ve mentioned, Enpass password manager does not upload your vaults or data anywhere. It’s local storage only. That’s great if you’re only using your passwords on one device, but chances are you will need them on multiple platforms, in which case you will have to sync. 

To set up syncing, you’ll need to click on the cloud icon in your Enpass desktop app and then allow permission for Enpass to create folders in cloud storage services of your choosing. You can sync to the following accounts:

  • iCloud
  • Google Drive
  • Box
  • OneDrive
  • Dropbox

Password sharing

Enpass also lets you share your passwords. Password sharing is not really something we would recommend, but of course it must sometimes be done. You may have a login that’s used by all members of a team at work, or perhaps a family account used by a household. In these instances sharing passwords is useful, but it something that should be done carefully to keep accounts safe.

It’s relatively easy to share passwords from one Enpass account to another, but you should take the appropriate steps to ensure you do it safely, as Enpass does not automatically do so itself.

Pick the password you want to send then click the Share option in the item menu. You should then be given a warning explaining that your shared items will not be encrypted, for this to happen you’ll need to create a PSK – pre-shared key. Don’t worry, although it sounds rather techy, it’s just a specific password that you and your sharee will use to access the shared password.

Using a PSK is highly recommended as Enpass will send all your details in plain text – that includes passwords, websites and usernames. This is incredibly risky and we do not quite understand why Enpass sends such sensitive details in such an unsecure way.

You can alter what details are shared. But regardless, you should always use a PSK as Enpass does not give you any encryption options. Once everything is ready you can share the details with an email.

Enpass plans and pricing

Free accountIndividualFamily
PriceFree$23.99 for the first year$35.99 for the first year
Number of items25UnlimitedUnlimited
Users allowed116

You can use the complete Enpass for free on Windows, Mac and Linux. However, the free mobile version is limited to just 25 items.

For unlimited use on desktop, mobile and all your other devices, the price is $15.99 for an individual plan billed every six months, or $23.99 for an individual plan billed yearly. Or you can just pay a one off fee of $79.99 for a lifetime subscription.

The Enpass paid options get you:

  • Unlimited number of items
  • Unlimited number of vaults
  • Use on unlimited number of devices
  • Receive alerts and notifications if your security has been breached
  • ID of your accounts that have 2FA support

If you’re planning on using Enpass with your entire household, you should opt for the family account. It’s currently on offer for just $35.99 for the first year rising to $47.99 yearly when the first 12 months is up. 

A family account gets you: 

  • Unlimited number of items
  • Unlimited number of vaults
  • Use on unlimited number of devices
  • Receive alerts and notifications if your security has been breached
  • ID of your accounts that have 2FA support
  • Can be used by up to 6 people

Enpass platforms and browsers

Enpass can be used on a variety of platforms and browsers. Let’s take a look at the different ways you can use this password manager.

Enpass on desktop

You can use Enpass for free on your Windows, Mac or Linux desktop computer.

Although usually, Windows and macOS versions have the most in common, here Linux joins the gang. So, visually you’ll have a much better experience.

That said, the installation instructions for some distributions are a bit unusual. They ask you to add the signature/key, verifying the apps’ integrity separately, when it is usually already included in the package. So, some decisions that the developers made seem questionable.

Overall, for Linux, it may be one of the best password managers. Since not only they have a nice interface, there are quite a lot of features as well. Yet, Windows and macOS users have a much bigger plate to choose from, so this doesn’t apply to them.

Enpass on mobile

Enpass works well on Android and iOS mobile devices. But unless you pay for your Enpass account you will be limited to just one vault and 25 entries. This may sound like a decent amount but it’s quite easy to reach your limit quickly. And with only one vault, if you like to have different entries organised in easy to locate sections, you’ll miss having that option.

Enpass on both iOS and Android supports each respective operating system’s fingerprint and facial recognition unlocking systems, as well as offering autofill on both OS. If you’re a wearable tech fan user you can even connect Enpass to an Android Wear device or an Apple Watch.

The mobile app functions much like the desktop app. Providing you’ve synced, you can access your vaults, conduct password audits, generate new passwords and more.

However, if you expect everything to be easy to find once you sign in, you may be in for a shock. Going back to some of our complaints with user friendliness, even if you’ve synced your account to a device, once you open the app on the device you then have to find Settings within the Enpass app, then click Vaults and then Sync again before you can dip into your data.

Enpass Chrome extension

Providing you have the Enpass desktop app installed on your computer, you can download an extension for the Chrome browser. You also have to have the Enpass password manager app up and running for the Chrome extension to work.

Once it’s added to Chrome, you can use the Enpass extension to autofill passwords, logins, payment details, personal information and more whilst you’re using the Chrome browser.

Chrome isn’t the only browser that is compatible with Enpass. It also works on:

  • Edge
  • Chrome
  • Firefox
  • Safari
  • Vivaldi

Set up and ease of use

First things first, download and install Enpass password manager onto your computer. Once that’s done and loaded up, you’ll need to create and confirm your account with your email address – so far, so good. 

Enpass set up screenshot

Then it’s time to make that vital master password. Your master password is the gatekeeper for the entire Enpass password manager app – you will always need it to get into Enpass and if you lose it or forget it, it can not be recovered. So it’s really important you don’t forget it.

For an extra layer of security, you can also create a key file to use alongside your master password, although this is optional. This is the only form of two factor authentication found in Enpass. Be aware that the key file cannot be recovered either if lost.

Enpass set up account screenshot

All that sounds fairly simple, but there were some issues. When we tried to add the key file for two factor authentication, we couldn’t find the option easily in the apps settings. Upon further exploration we found it hidden away under Change Master Password. In fact, we didn’t even find it ourselves. We had to consult the Enpass FAQ in the end.

Once we’d created the key file, we then had to scan the key on to a phone. But with no directions on how to generate a QR code to scan, we were left confused. We then had to manually upload the file to the phone. All in all, it was not a great user experience.

Enpass alternatives

With so many password managers to choose from, it can be difficult to decide which one is right for you. Now that you’ve read up on what we think of Enpass, let’s take a quick look at some of the alternatives that are available.

Enpass vs 1Password

Enpass is better than 1Password simply because it offers a free version and 1Password does not. 

We found that 1Password works best on Apple devices, so it’s ideal for iOS users and Mac owners. However the general look and design looks a bit dated across both its mobile and desktop apps.

An area where 1Password excels is its browser extensions. 1Password works really well on Chrome, Firefox, Brave, Safari andEdge when you use its extension, which is called 1Password X. Using this plug-in makes it really easy to fill in passwords and info when you’re on desktop. Unlike Enpass, 1Password also offers two-factor authentication.

New users signing up to 1Password will have to pay $36 for an annual cloud subscription. While 1Password used to offer a free version with limited features, this was unfortunately discontinued a while ago.

Read more: 1Password review

Enpass vs LastPass

LastPass is better than Enpass as it’s probably the most comprehensive and best password managers available.

LastPass is one of the best known and widely used password managers on the market. It’s easy to use, works on practically all platforms, has a lot of useful features and offers a great free version.

You don’t even have to download a LastPass app – you can use it completely through web browser extensions or its website.

LastPass’ free version can be synced on as many devices as you want and offers a range of features such as storing unlimited passwords, strong storage security and generating new passwords.

If you do opt for the paid version you’ll be able to save files online up to 1GB, two factor authentication keys, dark web monitoring as well as get tech support for problems and queries. LastPass paid will cost you $36 a year.

Read more: LastPass review

Enpass vs KeePass

Enpass is better than KeePass simply because it’s easier to use. 

KeePass is completely free to use, and has more customisation options than its competitors. However, this does mean that it’s a bit more suited to users who are confident with their tech skills.

Desktop KeePass is optimised for Windows but if you conduct some fine tuning it can work on Linux or Mac too. Sharing and syncing can be done via apps like Dropbox and similar, or simply through your home network. You can also pick from third party apps and browser extensions for iOS, Chrome and Android. So far we have found over 100 extensions and plugins that work with KeePass.

There’s certainly more to get to grips with when you’re using KeePass, so if you’re not planning to suit down and do some learning and tinkering, it may not be the password manager for you.

Check out our best password managers article for more great alternatives

Customer support

When you’re using software that’s looking after your most sensitive information, having good tech support in place is vital. The last thing you want is a seemingly unexplainable reason as to why you can’t access your data, or any other query that might arise.

If you need to get in touch with Enpass, you can contact the support team by phone or email. If you do want to speak to someone on the phone, be aware that the support line operates between 11am and 6pm India time. So depending where you are in the world, you may need to work out when you will be available to call, and it may be at an awkward time.

Luckily, Enpass also offers a range of support services on its website in the shape of user guides, common FAQs, a messaging forum and more. The documents online are detailed and comprehensive and really useful for troubleshooting. It’s all easy to navigate and search through too.

For what it’s worth we found the messaging forum was very useful with a number of active members who were keen to assist with queries and share knowledge. If you do have a problem with Enpass, we suggest hitting up the forum first.

Is Enpass good and should I get it?

Overall, Enpass works well as a basic password manager. However, there are some kinks in the system and peculiar steps that can be a bit of a pain. The controls could be more intuitive and using Enpass does not always flow in a seamless, user friendly way. In fact, on initial use we sometimes wanted to give up and go back to using our web browser’s default password manager.

That said, it does have good features if you stick with it. The password audit feature is very good (even though once it shows passwords that need changing you have to do it yourself – there are some of the kinks we are talking about), and Enpass certainly looks good with an attractive interface and design. Enpass also seems to be bug-free so that’s also a positive point.

Enpass is free on desktop, and while there are bumps on the way, it is still effective as a basic password manager. If you persevere and get to know the app properly, it would probably be a little easier to navigate. However, whether you’d rather do that than use a different password manager or simply the one in your web browser is down to you.

FAQs

Here, we’ll answer all your burning questions about Epass password manager.

Where does Enpass store passwords?

Enpass does not store or upload your passwords online or onto any remote servers. The only place they exist are within your password vaults on your desktop or on your devices. If you wish to, you can upload your data yourself onto different devices and cloud storage services of your choosing.

How much does Enpass password manager cost?

Enpass can be used for free with unlimited passwords on desktop, and that includes Windows as well as Mac and also Linux. You can download the Enpass mobile app for free but you will be limited to 25 passwords per device.
 
Unlimited usage across all mobile and desktop devices for 6 months costs $15.99, a yearly subscription costs $23.99 and for a one off payment of $79.99 you get a lifetime subscription.

Is Enpass password manager open source?

No, Enpass software is not open source. Whilst some users bemoan this fact, Enpass argues that by not being open source, user data is safer and more secure, and will never be moved from your personal vaults in a manner that could compromise the security of your data.

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Comments 1
  1. Jeroen says:

    Do keep in mind that getting a lifetime subscription will only give you the things offered in that tier. A couple of years ago they had a pro subscription, now it’s a premium subscription. They added a breach monitor to premium, which is not offered to pro subscribers unless they switch to a yearly plan (with a 5% discount) or buy lifetime again.

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