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Samsung admits to being hacked: what data has been affected?


South Korean multinational electronics corporation said it was hacked in July. It’s the second time this year that Samsung has suffered a significant security breach.

The security breach happened in late July but was only disclosed by the company on September 2.

Samsung said that an unauthorized party acquired information from some of Samsung’s US systems. On August 4, the company learned that the personal information of certain customers was affected.

“We have taken actions to secure the affected systems, and have engaged a leading outside cybersecurity firm and are coordinating with law enforcement,” Samsung said.

In some cases, the issue might have affected information such as name, contact and demographic information, date of birth, and product registration information. Samsung assured that Social Security, debit, and credit card numbers were not stolen.

“The information affected for each relevant customer may vary. We are notifying customers to make them aware of this matter,” it said.

Samsung noted no immediate action was necessary. However, the company recommends remaining cautious of unsolicited communications that ask for your personal information or refer you to a web page asking for personal information, avoiding clicking on links or downloading attachments from suspicious emails, and reviewing accounts for suspicious activity.

“Consumer devices were not affected in connection with this incident, and you can continue to use our products and services as usual.”

This March, a hacker collective, Lapsus$, claimed it had obtained source code for both activation servers and technology used to authenticate accounts, as well as algorithms for all biometric unlock operations.

At the time, Samsung downplayed the incident, anticipating no impact on its business and customers. The breach allegedly involved some source codes relating to the operation of Galaxy devices.


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